ONE IN THREE CHILDREN START SCHOOL WITH SIGNS OF TOOTH DECAY

The blame for this is laid at the door of soft drinks and fruit juices which have high sugar content but there is also the question of encouraging small children to start developing good habits in looking after their teeth.

image of ONE IN THREE CHILDREN START SCHOOL WITH SIGNS OF TOOTH DECAY
Blog spacer
In truth, our dental health is getting better and there are more children entering secondary school with less visible signs of tooth decay than in the 1970’s. However the work to ensure the next generation maximise their dental health has some way to go.

One myth quite common amongst parents of small children is that milk teeth don’t matter – they do!

But these early teeth help in the development of speech and eating behaviours as well as preparing the space for the permanent adult teeth. In addition, and perhaps even more importantly, getting used to looking after milk teeth educates the child into good maintenance habits at an impressionable age.

Thumb and pacifier sucking can also produce problems if continued beyond the age of five years. As the adult teeth emerge they can be displaced by applied pressure from the thumb or pacifier resulting in affected speech and aesthetic problems that may require orthodontic treatment.

Encouraging parents to bring children into the dental practice can help get the children used to the surroundings which can be important if the parent or friends exhibit dental anxiety as they can copy this behaviour.

Ideally, tooth maintenance starts as soon as the first tooth emerges. A clean soft cloth is enough to rub around the tooth to disrupt any dental plaque that will be building up but once other teeth emerge a child’s toothbrush with a small head should be used. As soon as two teeth are positioned next to each other then use floss to clean inter-dentally. Your dentist or hygienist can help with this by giving instruction.
Claim your FREE Electric Toothbrush

++ Dental Health Guide & Video series